BFI London Film Festival Review: LFF Connects Games with David Cage

Last night, I was lucky enough to go to the LFF Connects Games event at the Picturehouse Central cinema in London. The talk was with David Cage, head of game studio Quantic Dream, in conversation with Jonathan Ross. Quantic Dream has produced games such as Heavy Rain, Beyond: Two Souls and the upcoming Detroit: Become Human.

I haven’t had the opportunity to play any Quantic Dream games, but I’ve always admired the level of animation and humanity in these games, and so I was really excited to see this kind of talk coming up. Before looking up the London Film Festival this year, I didn’t know these kind of talks were a part of the festival. I was initially a bit ambivalent about this talk as I wasn’t quite sure how it would fit with the festival, however, I was pleasantly surprised.

A lot of the talk revolved around the concept of game design and narrative space, and how similar and dissimilar game design is to filmmaking. I was shocked at the amount of how much more work is needed to create open games like Heavy Rain script wise, for example, Quantic Dream usually produce around 2000 pages of script per game, while a usual film script is around 100 pages, and at how similar some of the techniques used to make these games are to filmmaking. However, the biggest thing that separated game design and filmmaking to me was the difference in collaboration. David Cage sees his games as him cowriting the characters and narrative with the player; he provides the options and narrative space, and the player fully develop them. 

I really enjoyed the talk, as I found the subject fascinating. The conversation between David Cage and Jonathan Ross was free flowing and very funny, and David Cage seems like such a nice person. 

I’ll leave you with an inspirational message from David Cage. ‘It’s not about the conclusion, it’s about the journey you take. ‘

4.5/5

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s